The Queen of fear

I recently drove down to Cornwall for a short break and decided I would read a novel connected to the local area. The hotel being located between two moors gave me the choice of The Hound of the Baskervilles, based on the legend of haunted Dartmoor in neighbouring Devon, or Jamaica Inn, located on Bodmin Moor, in Cornwall.

As I had passed the Jamaica Inn so many times along the A30 when visiting Cornwall, I thought it was high time to read Daphne du Maurier’s novel after being put off from doing so by Hitchcock’s film.

Published in 1936, it was her fourth novel and most successful up to that point, selling more copies in the first three months than her first three books combined. It established her as a serious novelist and led to her becoming one of the highest earning female authors in the UK in the 1950s.

She was only 29 when she wrote Jamaica Inn, a historical novel set in 1820 about wreckers and smugglers in Cornwall. Mary Yellan, the 23-year-old heroine, is forced to live with her aunt at the Jamaica Inn after her mother dies and discovers fairly quickly that it is run by a violent drunk smuggler who’s married to her aunt. Slowly, she learns of the dark secrets of the tavern, a thieves’ lair, where wagon loads of contraband are brought there in the middle of the night for hiding.

To Mary’s horror her Uncle Joss is the supposed head of the smuggling ring and she suspects he murdered, with the help of a mystery man, one of his co-smugglers who wanted out. Perhaps also to her horror, she finds herself falling in love with Jem, the younger brother of Joss who is a petty horse thief.

She wants to run away from the tavern but not without taking her poor aunt with her and turns to a vicar for help in a nearby village. But when her uncle in a drunken stupor confesses being a wrecker and murdering men, women and children, victims of the wrecked ships, she needs to escape. The vicar turns out not to be her saviour, but instead the mystery man and mastermind of the smuggling and wrecking venture.

Du Maurier is often mistakenly described as a romantic novelist, but nothing could be further from the truth as her work deals with much deeper subjects that are not normally associated with the genre. Neither in my opinion is Jamaica Inn a gothic romance as claimed on the back cover of my book and I would not necessarily compare it either to Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre or Emily Bronte’s Wuthering Heights, as some have done.

Enthusiasts of Du Maurier claim that the inspiration for Jamaica Inn came from her childhood interest to write an adventure story in the style of Treasure Island. She had once stayed at the Jamaica Inn and became interested in the tales of smuggling after becoming lost on Bodmin moor with her horse.

But her story is about male abuse of women, threats of rape and gang rape, murders, drunkenness, hostage-taking and even has a shootout at the end. A swashbuckling romance, it is not. There is indeed a lot of anger in the writing from the perspective of Mary Yellan, who has attitude and is never intimidated, not even by her seven foot giant of an uncle, a natural born killer. Mary Yellan doesn’t take any nonsense from men who are always trying to control her in some way. She’s smarter than them and knows to take her time. Her one goal is to remain independent of men and run her own farm one day, although Du Maurier does give ground on this narrative with a compromised ending.

The structure and content of the book reads more like a crime novel although with an unconventional setting. If placed in a contemporary setting with the uncle being a drug dealer and Mary Yellan plotting to escape him it would have all the makings of a traditional thriller.

Du Maurier wrote Jamaica Inn at a time when the hard-boiled detective novels were just beginning to entertain American readers. But she didn’t have to look at the trends taking place across the Atlantic for inspiration. Her stock-in-trade was creating an environment of fear and she often found it within the confines of her beloved Cornwall. Her following book, Rebecca (See also, September 23, 2016), set on the Cornish coast was to become her most accomplished work, again wrongly labelled for many years as a gothic novel, but now regarded as an exceptional psychological thriller.

Keep up to date with Tom Claver at http://www.tomclaver.co.uk

Parker – the steamroller

One of my favourite anti-heroes is Parker, the early sixties creation of Donald E. Westlake, who wrote a series of novels about the hard-boiled criminal under the name of Richard Stark.

Parker, a vicious man of few words and no remorse, doesn’t let anyone stand in his way and destroys any obstacle he comes up against.

He’s a sociopath who you would oddly want on your side, although Parker only has one side, his own. But the reader doesn’t mind and roots for him all the same.

Westlake’s introduction of Parker to the reader initially came in 1959 and appeared in several short stories published in Alfred Hitchcock’s Mystery Magazine. Then in 1962 he wrote the first Parker novel, The Hunter, later retitled Point Blank in the 1967 film with Lee Marvin playing the lead.

Within the opening paragraphs of the novel, the reader understands he’s angry as hell, doesn’t give a damn and is attractive to women who recognise him immediately as being “a bastard”. All of these observations are made while Parker is marching across New York’s George Washington Bridge in early morning rush hour. In fact, Westlake’s opening for Parker was inspired after he took the same walk across the bridge.

Westlake started putting pen to paper when he was a teenager and turned to full-time writing in 1960 when he was 27. He thought he could make additional money by writing paperbacks for the male market and chose the penname Stark to reflect his economical prose where style and story are stripped down for a racy read. His choice of Richard as a first name came from his favourite actor at the time, Richard Widmark.

When he started writing The Hunter in 1962 he thought it would only be a standalone novel because he held the view that bad guys always lose and Parker ends up arrested. But his editor had different ideas and told him that if Parker could escape custody he would have a series on his hands. He went on to publish over 20 Parker books with the final one being written just before his death in 2008.

Parker has attracted many filmmakers to produce their versions of the character and story, but Westlake never gave them permission to use the name of Parker because there was a reticence in allowing them to depict their own vision of his character. In the case of Point Blank, Lee Marvin was given the name of Walker, not Parker, while in the 1973 film, The Outfit, Robert Duvall’s character was called Macklin. Incidentally, Westlake said he preferred Duvall’s representation of Parker to Marvin’s.

Westlake was an accomplished screenwriter and his excellent script for the 1990 film The Grifters, based on a Jim Thompson novel, was nominated for an Academy Award. He also wrote the screenplay, The Stepfather, based on a story he’d co-written, which led to two sequels and a remake.

Westlake was a prolific author with more than 100 books published under various pseudonyms. He was versatile and humorous in his work, creating formidable plots and quick-fire dialogue. Under his real name he wrote comic capers about the hapless criminal character, John Dortmunder, first introduced in Bank Shot in 1972 and turned into a film with George C. Scott two years later. Dortmunder was the opposite to Parker and Westlake once said he enjoyed switching between the two characters to keep the ideas fresh.

During his career Westlake won three Edgar Awards, and a Mystery Writers of America Grand Master title, the highest honour bestowed by the society.

His only regret about Parker was his name. If he’d known it was going to become a series he would have given the character a first name as well to avoid looking for alternative ways of saying, “Parker parked the car”.

Keep up to date with Tom Claver at http://www.tomclaver.co.uk

Montalbano’s final curtain call

Fans of Inspector Montalbano will have one final novel to savour before saying farewell to the likeable commissario following the recent death of the Italian author, Andrea Camilleri. The grand finale for the inspector was written by the Sicilian years ago, but kept under lock and key by his publisher for the day he either got fed up with the character or was no longer able to write any more.

One could guess Salvo Montalbano’s end. A bust-up with his cretinous superiors leads to his resignation and him opening a trattoria somewhere on the Aeolian Islands where he can end his days eating to his heart’s content. We will all have to wait patiently to see his fate.

Camilleri was a late bloomer in crime writing. He wrote the first book in the Montalbano series when he was 69, and went on to write 30 more novels until his death in July at the age of 93. About 10m of his novels have been sold around the world, boosted by the popular TV series sold in 20 countries. In addition, he wrote 60 other books, writing well into his 80s.

For much of his life he was a theatre and TV director and early in his career he specialised in plays by the Nobel laureate, Luigi Pirandello, a relation. For the Italian national broadcasting company, RAI, his early works included directing Inspector Maigret, the French police detective created by Georges Simenon, who later became an influence on his writing.

In the late 1970s, Camilleri, a one-time poet, self-published a novel after failing to find a publisher. It didn’t sell well. Another novel followed in the 1980s and it too flopped. For a left-wing intellectual like Camilleri, who now was in his mid-50s, this could not have been easy to accept, especially after his friend, the renowned Sicilian author, Leonardo Sciascia, once told him he was wasting his time with his latest manuscript.

Another decade past and now in his late 60s his third book, La Stagione della caccia, an historical novel, did rather well. But as his 70th birthday was approaching he published in 1994 The Shape of Water, the first Inspector Montalbano mystery, set in fictional Vigata, but in reality, Porto Empedocle, his place of birth on the western coast of Sicily.

It was an immediate success in Italy despite being written in a quirky mixture of Italian and Sicilian dialect, a technique of his own making.

There was nothing particularly innovatory about Inspector Montalbano, the freewheeling detective who constantly rails against the establishment. Even the traits of the gourmet investigator were borrowed from the character of the Spanish private detective, Pepe Carvalho, written by the Catalan author, Manuel Vazquez Montalban. As a tribute to the writer, Camilleri, named his own detective after him.

But what was new to readers were his stories of mostly local folk getting into complicated messes that only Montalbano could unravel. There was a casualness to his plots that appealed to many with no one really knowing in which direction the story was heading until the eighteenth chapter when everything is resolved. All of his novels are divided into 18 chapters.

He only touched upon the mafia in his books as secondary characters as he never wanted to glamorise them in the same way they were depicted in Mario Puzo’s The Godfather. But his novels did cover fascism, something he fought against most of his life as an outspoken critic.

When he was young his early poetry won national prizes and he went on to study stage and film in Rome. He became used to his literary novels being rejected over almost a life time until he hit upon the crime genre where he could express his political views to a mass audience. And once he found his feet at a time when most people that age are planning their retirement homes, he excelled, and not even near blindness in his later years could stop him from writing as he would turn to dictating his books.

When Inspector Montalbano takes his last bow, let’s remember the long journey he took to reaching readers and viewers alike and the author who never gave up.

Keep up to date with Tom Claver at http://www.tomclaver.co.uk

The F. Scott Fitzgerald of crime writing

Kenneth Millar, better known under his pen name of Ross Macdonald, is largely recognised for scaling new heights in crime novel writing in the middle of the last century because of his finesse in handling the genre.

Born in California in 1915, but raised in Canada, he began writing in 1939 after being inspired by the success of his wife, Margaret Sturm, the mystery writer who wrote under the name of Margaret Millar.

They lived in Santa Barbara, California, for the remainder of their lives, and it became the setting for his Lew Archer character, a divorced former cop-turned private eye, in post-war Los Angeles.

Archer displayed all the traits of Dashiell Hammett’s Sam Spade and Raymond Chandler’s Philip Marlowe as a wisecracking PI crusading against the bad and the ugly, but in a later era. In fact, so inspired by Hammett, he took the name for his protagonist from Spade’s murdered partner Miles Archer in The Maltese Falcon.

Even the themes were familiar as he wrote about the idle rich, bad marriages and dysfunctional offspring. But for the author, who’d gained a PhD in literature, his real ambition was to become one day a serious writer under his own name.

And yet, ironically, he fulfilled his dream under his nom de plume with literary critics hailing him for blending a “whodunit” with a psychological thriller with such great aplomb.

Macdonald began to surpass his two famous predecessors when his hardboiled thrillers gave way to a retelling of Greek myths based on a modern Californian narrative about family secrets, childhood traumas and skeletons in the cupboard. He once told Newsweek that he owed this transformation in his work to seeing a therapist, claiming that Freud was an important influence on his newfound voice. Turning tragedies of ordinary life into potboilers became his signature theme.

Though the early Archer series were well written, including his first, The Moving Target (1949), it wasn’t until after his epiphany on the psychiatrist couch, when he wrote The Galton Case (1959), that he came into his own, writing about his personal life experiences. Archer becomes the conduit in piecing together the story of lives of others. While some critics complained that from that moment onwards he ended up reworking and rewriting the same novel, others claim that he was clever enough to keep unearthing something new in every version. It would be another 10 years with the publication of The Goodbye Look that he was finally rewarded with the critical accolades he’d craved for when starting out as a serious writer.

Many have written about the Holy Trinity of American crime writers of Hammett, Chandler, and Macdonald, but it was the latter who became the most academically respected. He also wrote more books than Hammett and Chandler combined with the Archer series totalling 18. Although Hammett created the PI genre, and Chandler perfected it, Macdonald pushed the crime novel into new directions.

Like Hammett and Chandler, he had critical success also in Hollywood with Paul Newman starring in both Harper (1966), based on The Moving Target, and later The Drowning Pool (1975).

Chandler didn’t take to the newcomer and described his prose as strained and pretentious. The feeling may have been mutual as Macdonald thought Chandler’s work lacked “tragic unity”. As a Dashiell Hammett fan, I could not comment. Hammett’s writing is pure and economical, while Chandler cuts clean and creates scenes that remain in a reader’s memory forever. Macdonald is silky and true to the traditions of Hammett and Chandler. In fact, he gave a new lease of life to the genre, just as his predecessors had done in their respective periods.

Was it such a coincidence that Hammett’s first PI novel hit the bookshelves in 1929, Chandler’s in 1939 and Macdonald’s in 1949? Was it not the sharp eye of the same publisher, Alfred A. Knopf, recognising what readers wanted from each author and shrewdly nudging the genre along in keeping with the time?

Macdonald’s books are written so elegantly that he was admired by poets as his stories were from the heart, and to describe him as the F. Scott Fitzgerald of crime writers would not be an overstatement as Fitzgerald was an author that had greatly inspired him.

Keep up to date with Tom Claver at http://www.tomclaver.co.uk

Hoping for a big thriller year

Last year proved to be a relatively quiet 12 months for the thriller market in terms of blockbusters. The publishing industry did its utmost to meet readers’ interests by offering the usual plethora of subgenres but there was no stand-out thriller as in previous years.

The ever popular domestic noir market still looks as strong as ever following the runaway successes of Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl and later Paula Hawkins’ The Girl on the Train.

This subgenre has seen in recent years an exponential growth in interest as it changed the reading habits of many women who are preferring to seek out female-centric titles that keep them on the edge of their seats.

Women form the majority of thriller readers and their surge in interest in domestic noir has built up sales in the UK market of around 20m books per year.

This type of crime fiction is not only changing the psychological makeup of women in novels, but is possibly challenging the traditional narratives of the thriller.

The use of multiple narrators, a general absence of typical thriller tropes, and their softer climaxes seem to be altering the perspective of what is chilling, given that the stories often revolve around humdrum urban lives.

But framing a story around terrible marriages and abusive relationships is nothing new to the thriller market. It is a deeply mined subject of the traditional psychological thriller. Rebecca, The Postman Always Rings Twice, Double Indemnity, and Dial M for Murder are all examples of the subgenres popularity in earlier decades.

Perhaps the real difference between the older classics and the modern domestic noir, is, as others have already pointed out, that the investigation being carried out by the writer is really about the breakdown of the relationship rather than the murder itself. The murder is no more than a McGuffin.

Money and control are often at the heart of a thriller, and it is no different in domestic noir. The woman is invariably dependent on a husband who is unfaithful and she feels her position becoming suddenly vulnerable because the man poses a threat.

But unlike the archetypically doomed femme fatales of the past – written mostly by men – the female characters in domestic noir tend to end up coming out on top. They are no longer the victims.

Amy in Gone Girl manages to get the upper hand, Jodi, a psychologist, in The Silent Wife, gets away with despatching her philandering partner, while in Season to Taste, dear Lizzie Prain has no qualms in eating her husband.

The thriller market has always been the golden goose for publishers, film makers, theatre and radio producers, alike. Nearly everyone from all backgrounds enjoys being transferred to an edgy world where they can be frightened or held in suspense.

It is an organic genre that keeps evolving and sub-dividing into subgenres. How long domestic noir will remain popular is anyone’s guess. This trend will no doubt reach a limit amongst readers and will probably give way one day to a new vogue in crime fiction, in the same way that Nordic noir thrillers are now starting to lose their shine.

Could the absence of a big blockbuster in 2017 be a sign of uncertainty about the direction that the thriller market is currently heading? Even in the cinema it seems to me that fewer traditional thrillers are being made. Is there some uncertainty about what people really want from a thriller today as there is so much competition from other genres?

A relatively fallow year for crime fiction doesn’t mean anything, of course, as the whole of the book market goes through such trends from time to time. While it is not a rare phenomenon it does seem curious that there was no real big splash in the thriller market last year given the huge number of books in the marketplace.

Too much choice? Not enough book critics in the media shining their torches on hidden gems? I have no idea how publishing houses pick and choose books, but as a consumer of their products I would urge them to go out on a limb and just take more risks.

Keep up to date with Tom Claver at http://www.tomclaver.co.uk

Life can be murder for Martin

The time has come to let you know about my new book. For readers seeking an unusual hero to root for, then step forward, Martin, a hapless journalist who works on a London-based financial magazine.

Martin desperately wants to tell you his side of the story about how the blue-eyed new boy, Tom de Lacy, turned up one day in the newsroom, and ended up grabbing all of the limelight, not to mention the well-paid industrial correspondent’s job that he had his eye on.

Once he lost out to Tom, life was never quite the same for him but I’ll let him tell you all about that. If only Martin could match Tom and his amazing elevation into television. If only he too could be, well, a bit like Tom really, someone whose ability was admired by all and sundry.

And it wasn’t an impossibility as he was every much Tom’s equal in journalism. But keeping a job and remaining solvent can be murder, and in certain circumstances could even give rise to it.

Watching Tom’s career blossom wasn’t easy for Martin, so when a really unexpected turn of events occurs, he just had to grab the opportunity with both hands.

But I’ll let Martin tell you how he got into trouble. Just go on to Amazon and pre-order his story now. It’s called, SCOOP OF THE YEAR.

Available in paperback or e-book:

Amazon UK: http://tinyurl.com/y7zwqmqc

Amazon US: http://tinyurl.com/ycyhcx5w

Keep up to date with Tom Claver at http://www.tomclaver.co.uk

100 years of the modern spy thriller

This year marks the centenary of the publication of The Thirty-Nine Steps, arguably the world’s first modern spy thriller.

When John Buchan wrote the book around the outbreak of the Great War, he set a template not only for today’s espionage novels but for all thrillers alike.

It was innovative for its time, with its fast and speedy style, drawing on all the latest technology of the era, such as the single-wing plane, fast cars, motorbikes, radio, telephone and probably the first reference in literature to a semi-automatic gun.

While some credit Erskine Childers’ 1903 Victorian novel The Riddle of the Sands, as the first spy thriller ever published, there are many who point to Buchan as the father of the genre because of his modern writing style that aligns him with 20th century thriller writers.

Childers’ adventure story certainly had an influence on Buchan who wrote on the same theme about the threat of a German invasion of Britain. It had become a popular storyline among many writers since the 1880s until the eventual outbreak of World War One in 1914. Buchan’s novel was in fact the last to be written on the subject.

Buchan was born in Perth, Scotland, and went to Glasgow University and Oxford. He was already writing at this stage of his life, winning awards including for poetry. Despite his constant ill health, he was a barrister, MP, solder, writer and publisher.

His first success as an author was the publication of Prester John in 1910. It tells the story of a young Scotsman named David Crawfurd and his adventures in South Africa, where a Zulu uprising is tied to the medieval legend of Prester John. The hero in this story is later reincarnated as Richard Hannay in The Thirty-Nine Steps.

Buchan was looking to write a best seller as he had a good eye for book trends as a publisher. It took him only a few weeks to pen The Thirty-Nine Steps just after the outbreak of war, publishing the short novel the following year in October 1915. It was an instant hit with the solders in the trenches because not only did it take their minds off the fighting, but it was the type of book they could read in short bursts. Buchan had hit on a winning formula.

The premise of an innocent man getting accidentally caught up in international intrigue has become the bread and butter of many latter-day thriller writers. It is the classic call to adventure that makes this theme so enduring.

But the set-up used by Buchan has such a contemporary feel, providing you can put aside the anachronistic characters he describes in Edwardian Britain. Richard Hannay, a Scottish mining engineer, returns to London from Rhodesia and is so bored that he’s at the point of returning to Africa when he stumbles on a murder that could have implications to Britain’s security. Suddenly, his world is turned upside down and he’s on the run.

Buchan realised that the stakes had to be high to be put the readers on the edge of their seat. And nothing could be higher than Britain’s secret naval plans possibly falling into the hands of German spies. This at a time when his readers already understood what it felt to be at war.

Twenty years after its publication Hitchcock brought new life to the book with a comedy thriller, improving the story, and setting new standards in modern film making. Hitchcock via Buchan had established the chase thriller and then went on to re-cycle The 39 Steps in the guise of Foreign Correspondent, Saboteur, and North by Northwest.

I have to confess I’m a sucker of the man-on-the-run theme and in my debut thriller, HIDER/SEEKER, I have used it in an inverse way.

My favourite type of thriller is where an ordinary man, minding his own business, is suddenly put into jeopardy. In HIDER/SEEKER, the main character, Harry Bridger, is no ordinary man, but his nightmare begins when his client goes on the run.

I remember exactly where I first read The Thirty-Nine Steps. It was while on holiday in Torridon, in the Northwest Highlands of Scotland. We had rented a cottage and the landlord had left a pile of books for a rainy day. I sat down on a sofa after supper and never got up again until I’d finished the book. I can’t say that I’ve done that with many books.

The enigmatic title, which does not provide a credible pay off in the book, though Hitchcock does better, came from Buchan’s six year old daughter, Alice. She gifted him the title of his new novel while he was staying in a house in Kent with his family. It was the number of steps that went down to the beach from the house as told in the book’s finale.

Buchan was created Baron of Tweedsmuir of Elsfield and held the position of Governor-General of Canada until his death in 1940.

The British historian, G.M Trevelyan*, paid the following tribute to him. ‘I don’t think I remember anyone whose death evoked a more enviable outburst of sorrow, love and admiration.’

The book was published on 19 October 1915 by Blackwood & Sons of Edinburgh and the John Buchan Museum in Peebles, Scotland, will be celebrating its publication with a special exhibition. (See News)

* G.M Trevelyan’s work was much admired by Dr Rod Whitaker’s wife who suggested to her husband that he adopt the surname as his pseudonym, Trevanian. (See The countdown begins, 4 March 2015)

Keep up to date with Tom Claver at www.tomclaver.co.uk’.

The countdown begins

Having reached a very respectable age I thought it was high time to fulfil a lifelong ambition of publishing a thriller. I hope you will enjoy reading HIDER/SEEKER when it is launched as an e-book by Amazon from 29 April.

If you take a look at my home page you’ll read why it has taken me so embarrassingly long to get my act together and how I got the bug to write when I took creative writing classes with Dr Rod Whitaker in the early 1970s. He wrote under the pen name of Trevanian and was possibly best known for his debut thriller, “The Eiger Sanction,” which was turned into a film by Clint Eastwood.

I’ve paid a big tribute to the late Dr Whitaker on my web and would really like to hear from anyone who studied under him or who knew him well. He was an elusive author who baffled many people in his lifetime because of his keenness to keep his real name a secret. This led to all sorts of conspiracy theories, which I would imagine he enjoyed.

I didn’t go to his evening classes with any specific intention other than to get away from my awful bedsit and an annoying tenant. But I was captivated by the story of his first book becoming an international best seller and being turned into a film by Eastwood, a film maker I have always admired.

So he gave me the appetite to write and I did nothing about it all my life until 10 years ago when I decided it was now or never to learn how to write a thriller. I read lots of books on writing, but they didn’t mean anything to me until I wrote something that resembled a book. It’s only once you have written a novel that you understand what these books are trying to teach you.

Dr Whitaker inspired me to write, but showing me how to do it was largely down to three women who I’d like to thank in my first ever blog.

I sent my first attempt at writing a thriller to Bernie Ross, a former fiction editor and literary editor, who provided me with a 10-page critique (singled lined) blitzing my prose. There was absolutely nothing, and I mean nothing, that she thought was right about the book. When I read her response I think I laughed aloud at how hopeless I was because that was all one could do. As a professional journalist, I didn’t see it as intimidating but as a perfectly good analysis of what was wrong with my writing. It was nothing personal, just business, as they say.

I took it upon myself to re-write some chapters as an academic exercise, doing it the way Bernie had suggested. And what an improvement. I’d hit upon a style of writing that suited me and I re-edited the whole book. We became friends and we have remained in touch ever since. Bernie still writes occasionally, but her great passion now is painting. (http://www.bernrossartist.com)

Now that I had written a book, I needed an agent. I was soon to discover that this would be the most depressing part of the whole writing experience. Although I never found an agent, I did receive a most encouraging telephone call from the indefatigable Betty Schwartz. She was with Futerman Rose at the time, and had previously been submissions editor at Hodder. Betty took the trouble of picking up the phone and telling me that she liked my style of writing. She helped sharpen my prose and told me not to give up. Anyone who has had the good fortune of coming into contact with Betty knows she is one of the nicest people you could ever wish to meet in publishing.

The book never got published, however, and I wrote another one, which also bit the dust. My third attempt was HIDER/SEEKER, which was a reworking of a film script I wrote many years ago. This time around I think I have hit all the marks, thanks mainly to the critical eye of Hilary Johnson Authors’ Advisory Service. There is no hiding place when Hilary analyses your MS. Hilary is always at the ready to administer the castor oil when it is needed and delivers it with such charm that you feel like asking for more.

So a big thank you to these ladies who have played their part in getting me over the finishing line.

But there is a very special fourth lady I would like to praise, my wife. She has put up with all my anxieties and pushed me into completing this ambition. She is the first reader of my books, and I want to especially thank her for making me stick to the course that I had set such a long time ago.

Keep up to date with Tom Claver at www.tomclaver.co.uk’.